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diseasome.jpg
the NYTimes seems to churn out high-quality data visualizations faster than I can blog them.

a network visualization linking different diseases, represented by circles, to the genes they have in common, represented by squares. each circle represents a disease or disorder & is scaled to the number of genes associated to that disease.

this map improves the understanding of the causes of disease & of the functions of particular genes. for instance, two genes have recently been found to influence the risk of both diabetes & prostate cancer.

[link: nytimes.com & nytimes.com (original article)]

see also:
. curehunter
. epidemiological map

MORE

diseasome2.jpg

diseasome3.jpg

4 COMMENTS

It's an excellent visualization, the kind of thing that'll help me get over my addiction to on-paper news delivery.

For my take on the "diseasome" visualization and on the Times's "All of Inflation’s Little Parts," please visit --

http://intelligententerprise.com/blog/archives/2008/05/for_the_new_yor.html

Fri 30 May 2008 at 10:01 AM

"this map improves the understanding of the causes of disease & of the functions of particular genes"

Wish it was as simple as looking at an eye-candy visualization like that one. This map improves the visualization of some of the relationships described between genes and diseases.

"for instance, two genes have recently been found to influence the risk of both diabetes & prostate cancer."

Visualization of this networks has nothing to do with these types of discoveries. It takes, large, long and expensive association studies.

Wed 04 Jun 2008 at 8:03 AM

@ibuch - I am fine with your critique.

as you might have noticed, the quoted text was lifted/based from the NYTimes article, & should be taken with a healthy amount of criticism. of course the graph is quite beautified, but for the sake of truth, let's hope the researchers indeed made the quoted discovery on a visual graph that was at least somehow similar?

Wed 04 Jun 2008 at 5:15 PM
infosthetics

Thanks, I read it there too :)
Although, I'm pretty sure that the discovery wasn't made based on a graph. However, a graph could pop out previously unnoticed shared genes between diseases... But because to construct it, you make a high effort on data integration. And that, although obvious for most of the people reading this great blog, is a pendent issue (together with data viz) to be tackled in bioinformatics.

Wed 04 Jun 2008 at 6:30 PM
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